5 Great Resources To Use After Rehab

Congratulations on the massive achievement of completing rehab! Now that you understand your triggers, have faced your substance abuse issues head-on, and have a great idea of how you hope your future will look, it’s time to start thinking about ways in which you’ll be able to maintain long-term sobriety. For five resources you can depend on after rehab, read on.

1. A Positive Support System

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One of the best possible resources anyone can have after coming out of rehab is a positive support system. Whether you’ve built your support system through a stay at Hope House (thehopehouse.com) for help with mental health and substance abuse issues or plan to rely on friends and family, your support team is important.

 

For some people, having a solid support team means more connections to sober resources, a place to stay, and help with finding a job and filling free time with clean activities. Other people will use their support system to call in times when they’re struggling with their substance abuse issues. By openly identifying members of your positive support team, you’ll be better equipped to handle hard days that inevitably crop up along any recovery journey.

2. AA and NA Meetings

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Many people have great luck with AA and NA meetings for people with alcohol and addiction issues. Maybe you’re someone who recently had behavioral therapy at an anxiety treatment center in California specializing in relapse prevention. A great way to transition from an inpatient mental health treatment center to life after rehab could be as simple as regular meetings with other people recovering from substance use disorders.

3. Peer Supports

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Coming up with a clear list of peer supports is a great idea for anyone just leaving rehab. From people you met in rehabilitation who are serious about staying clean to people you knew before your treatment, it’s smart to surround yourself with peers you can count on for social events and activities. Instead of returning to that group of party friends you once abused substances with, having a plan to socialize with peers with healthy lifestyles will mean fewer triggers. Start by being honest with your friends about your new, sober lifestyle and ask them to do what they can to hold you accountable for your actions. While recovery is no one’s responsibility but yours, it can be easier with a trusted group of friends who want to see you succeed and are willing to keep you distracted or even just serve as good company.

4. Religion and Spirituality

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Anyone who’s ever attended an AA meeting knows about the first step being admitting they are powerless. By surrendering to a higher power (God or otherwise) the philosophy behind AA and NA meetings is that it takes something bigger than a person’s will alone to maintain sobriety after addiction. If your belief in a higher power helps you stay committed to recovery goals, it’s okay to use the church, God, a Bible, or any other form of spiritual practice as a resource.

5. Personal Mentors, Life Coaches, and Therapists

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Finding a personal mentor, life coach, or therapist you can share your struggles and triumphs with will be important as you move forward in recovery. After rehabilitation, think about beginning psychotherapy or another form of counseling. When searching for a therapist, look for someone with experience in addiction therapy and treatment.

 

At the end of the day, how you manage your sobriety after rehab is a personal decision. For some people, leaning on a team of supports is a great way to ensure long-term sobriety. Others have better luck turning to a higher power or attending regular meetings. Whatever your method, the important thing is that you make yourself and your sobriety a top priority. You’ve come this far and can maintain a healthy lifestyle if you continue to put your mind to it. Take some time to identify the right resources for you when times get hard. Don’t forget to treat yourself to something special to celebrate your success. You deserve it!

Nicole Thompson

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